Ian Singleton

Posted in Boddd by iansingleton on August 19, 2010
Back at the start of August, I set myself the task of working through all of my scans to decide which of these I valued the most. These were the ones that I would defend the hardest; the ones that I would move into the citadel if I had to preserve only a few. 22000 scans, give or take a couple of hundred. In paper terms, that’s 44 of those packs of paper that you buy to put in a photocopier. I decided that I’d give myself until Christmas to work through them all. That meant looking at 150 each day.
I finished this morning. It’s taken me just under three weeks. And in those three weeks, I’ve used just under four hours to look at every single scan.
It’s actually pretty each to do so when they are laid out like this. You can skim straight through the stuff that you know that you won’t ever look at again – instructions for domestic appliances I no longer own, invoices for projects – and for companies – long dormant.
And in a sense, it’s irrelevant, because all 22000 scans, compressed, take up slightly more than a Gb in storage space. Small enough to fit on a USB stick on my keyring. And all backed up to two online storage facilities.
It’s actually about moving them into the front of my mind. There’s a line in the Baz Luhrman song Sunscreen, in which the narrator urges the listener to “Keep your old love letters. Throw away your old bank statements.” Which is pretty much what I have done.
And the result?
I selected the “important” ones and re-exported them at full size and high resolution. How many did I choose to “save”?
791, or about 2.75% of the total.

Back at the start of August, I set myself the task of working through all of my scans to decide which of these I valued the most. These were the ones that I would defend the hardest; the ones that I would move into the citadel if I had to preserve only a few. 22000 scans, give or take a couple of hundred. In paper terms, that’s 44 of those packs of paper that you buy to put in a photocopier. I decided that I’d give myself until Christmas to work through them all. That meant looking at 150 each day.
I finished this morning. It’s taken me just under three weeks. And in those three weeks, I’ve used just under four hours to look at every single scan.
It’s actually pretty each to do so when they are layed out like this. You can skim straight through the stuff that you know that you won’t ever look at again – instructions for domestic appliances I no longer own, invoices for projects – and for companies – long dormant.
And in a sense, it’s irrelevant, because all 22000 scans, compressed, take up slightly more than a Gb in storage space. Small enough to fit on a USB stick on my keyring. And all backed up to two online storage facilities.
It’s actually about moving them into the front of my mind. There’s a line in the Baz Luhrman song Sunscreen, in which the narrator urges the listener to “Keep your old love letters. Throw away your old bank statements.” Which is pretty much what I have done.
And the result?
I selected the “important” ones and re-exported them at full size and high resolution. How many did I choose to “save”?
791, or about 2.75% of the total.

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